Five of the Best!

Here are five resources that we think would make great reading for Lang-Lit teachers. All of these titles present key concepts, ideas and methods in detail and provide expert guidance for further reading. Highly recommended!


1. Paul Simpson (2014) Stylistics: A Resource Book for Students, 2ndedn. London: Routledge.

This book is an excellent introduction to stylistics. The updated second edition covers most of not all of the key concepts in stylistics and the innovative three-part structure offers activities and extended examples of further reading. There is also a companion website with commentaries and additional essays and resources, including an extended set of notes on ‘style and humour’.


2. Geoffrey Leech and Mick Short (2007) Style in Fiction: A Linguistic Introduction to English Fictional Prose2ndedn. London: Longman.

This second edition of the seminal text on the representation of speech and thought contains detailed explanations, rigorous analyses of texts and plenty of opportunities for further activities and research. This would also make excellent wider reading material for students working on NEA investigations of fictional speech.


3. Marina Lambrou and Peter Stockwell (eds) Contemporary Stylistics. London: Continuum.

A book packed with chapters on different texts and arranged by literary genre (prose, poetry, dialogue and drama). Again, these will be useful for teachers preparing for particular topics as well as providing wider reading for students’ NEA work.


4. Louise Mullany and Peter Stockwell (2015) Introducing English Language, 2ndedn. London: Routledge.

Again in its second edition, this book offers an excellent introduction to all aspects of language study, including a number of sections on stylistics. Like Simpson’s book, it also has a companion website with lots of additional features and resources.


5. Lesley Jeffries and Dan McIntyre (eds) (2011) Teaching Stylistics. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.

Part of the Teaching the New Englishseries, this book focuses on the teaching of stylistics across different topic areas. Although the coverage is largely on higher education, most of the chapters can be recontextualised for the secondary classroom.


THESE READING SUGGESTIONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AS A PDF HERE